Charles Brindley lives and maintains a studio in several old Victorian structures in Adairville, a small community 35 miles north of Nashville, Tennessee. He has been represented by galleries in numerous cities, including Nashville, Memphis, Taos, Washington, DC and New York City. His work appears in public and corporate collections throughout the United States and in private collections internationally.

Five touring exhibitions of Brindley’s works have travelled to museums and art centers in the Southeast and Midwest. There have been three major retrospectives of the artist’s career. The Tennessee State Museum presented Landscape Vision: Works of Charles Brindley 1980-1997 and in 2007 the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science organized Trace and Transformation, an exhibit spanning a twenty year period. Far Hills, Images of the Tennessee Residence, an exhibit of commissioned drawings and paintings of the historic mansion of Tennessee’s Governors, completed a schedule of eight venues throughout the state in 2006. In 2015 an exhibit of Brindley's imagery of ancient and mysterious trees spanning three decades- Trees of Myth and Legend, opened at Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art. In August of 2018 Salient Features: Trees of Old Forests and Woodland Pastures will open at the Kentucky Museum. 

Charles Brindley’s drawings and paintings depict a variety of symbol-laden subjects, including giant deciduous trees, panoramic landscapes, prehistoric ruins, rock formations, architecture and still lifes. His images are highly representational but contain multi-layered abstract elements.

Top Section of Ancient Bur Oak in Open Field, 2016, oil on canvas, 30x48 inches, collection of Doris and Dan Hixon, Nashville, TN.

Top Section of Ancient Bur Oak in Open Field, 2016, oil on canvas, 30x48 inches, collection of Doris and Dan Hixon, Nashville, TN.

The Art of Charles Brindley is at once consolingly old and confoundingly new.

- Quote courtesy of Robert L. McGrath, Professor of Art History, Emeritus, Dartmouth College.

Trees are sanctuaries.

Whoever knows how to listen to them experiences the truth.

- Herman Hesse

The Green Man, 2000, oil on canvas, 60x48 inches, collection of Ellen and George Wright, Nashville, TN

The Green Man, 2000, oil on canvas, 60x48 inches, collection of Ellen and George Wright, Nashville, TN

Salient Features, 2016-17, graphite on paper, 29x21 inches, collection of Sidney Clein, Nashville, TN.

Salient Features, 2016-17, graphite on paper, 29x21 inches, collection of Sidney Clein, Nashville, TN.

In Brindley's aesthetic canon, age and beauty are inseparable handmaidens, the former eliciting the latter.        

- RLM

 

The wonder is that we can see these trees and not wonder more.

- Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature (1836)

Acknowledgements

Thank you to Nathanial Brindley, Site Development, Mary Davidson, General Text and Edit, Robert L. McGrath, Professor of Art History, Emeritus at Dartmouth College for use of quotes and excerpts from his essay The Shamanic Art of Charles Brindley and the Reenchantment of and by the Natural World.